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Smart checklists make you think

The power of checklists in other disciplines
In other mature disciplines like medicine, aviation, construction where the impact of simple defects is enormous, it is smart checklists that have come to the rescue and saved millions of dollars and saved many lives.

The Checklist Manifesto  by Atul Gawande, a surgeon, extols the power of checklist. He states that any problem can be categorised into simple, complex and complicated, and how the smart checklists can solve these.

‘Simple’ problems are those that are individualistic in nature with a set of stuff to be done, while ‘Complicated’ problems implies multiple teams/people coordination/timing issues, and ‘Complex’ problem is where outcomes are different despite same application.

Checklists are not mindless compliance
Smart checklists are not about mindless compliance, not about ticking boxes, it is really about tickling the brain to think better and ensure fault-proofing rapidly. In our industry, checklists have been seen a cheap brainless activity that is about ticking the checkboxes, and therefore presumed to be useless.

Smart checklists make you think
To solve complex problems, “push the power of decision making from a central authority to the periphery, allowing people to make decision and take responsibility”  (Atul Gawande).

The checklist needs to allow for judgement to be used in the tasks rather than enforce compliance, so that actions may be taken responsibly. Hence, a smart checklist is about enabling your thinking process by having:

  • Set of checks to ensure stupid but critical stuff is not overlooked
  • Set of checks to ensure coordination
  • To enable responsible actions to be taken without having to ask for authority.

Good checklists are precise and easy to use in most difficult situations, it does not spell out everything, but provides reminders of critical & important steps that even highly skilled professionals would miss.

Checklists seem to defend everyone, a kind cognitive net designed to catch flaws of memory and attention, a well designed checklist enables one to DO well, SYNC with others well, and take appropriate ACTions as needed. [5]

“The power of checklists is limited, they help experts remember how to manage a complex process or machine, make priorities clearer and prompt people to function well as a team.  By themselves, however, checklists cannot make anyone follow them.” [Boorman, Boeing]

We use checklists too, but are we effective?
Do we use checklists for early tests like DevTest? Yes, we do. But from what I have seen of numerous checklists like code review/UI checklists , it is more often is used like a compliance assessment, of ticking away a long list of items-to-check for. So this turns to be a mindless job and suffers poor implementation, as it is most ill suited for smart validation.

Smart checklist enables developing clean code
So should we really do dev test? Should we not become sensitive and write cleaner code? Well lean thinking (aka Agile) is of producing less bugs in the first place, not about testing more.

A ‘Smart DevChecklist’ enables one  to precisely accomplish this, to become more sensitive and written code that certainly does L1 through L4 issues. Remember, this is the most cost effective method to good quality. Well, a Smart DevChecklist is an efficient complement to dev test enabling an easy and efficient method to producing great code.



If you are keen to try out a SmartDevChecklist to rapidly do DevTest without the pain of dev test, it is available as part of the e-book listed alongside.


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LEAN: It is not doing more, it is about doing less

So, what should be really happening in Agile context?
Lean thinking is what inspired the Agile movement. Lean is about not producing waste in the first place. It is doing things ‘clean’ at at the first place,  so that waste is ideally not there. Waste in software context are bugs. And in the early stages there are ‘unit bugs’. Since our focus in Agile is to find these earlier and to ensure that they are never there whenever we modify, we resort to a high degree of automation. Therefore we have a large body of test cases at the lower levels automated to ensure that we can continually execute them. This is great, but should we not focus on adopting a practice that in essence prevents these issues and lessen the need for large number of unit tests to uncover these?

It is not about doing more, it is about doing less
When we find issues in the product/app especially those that can be caught earlier, we focus on more rigorous dev test with extreme focus on automation. Yes, that seems logical. But what a minute, for a developer already busy writing code, is this the right approach? Given that dev test is largely about issues in L1 thru L4, could we not focus on getting this right or statically assess these via smart checklist?

Great quality early stage code is not about doing more testing, it really is doing about doing less test, by enabling sharper focus on ‘what-can-go-wrong’, ‘have-you-considered-this’.

The ebook outlines in detail outlines how to purposefully do DevTest in the “LEANest” by clearly outlining what issues a dev has to go after and outlines SmartDevChecklist to do this the most LEAN way.

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“Roadmap to Quality” – Panel discussion at SofTec 2012 Conference

SofTec 2012, Bangalore, July 14, 2012

The panel discussion on “Roadmap to Quality” was brilliant due to the cross-pollination of interesting ideas from non-software domains. Three of the four panelists were from non-software domains – Mehul@Arvind Retail, Soumen@GM, Raghavendra@Trellborg with lone exception of Murthy from Samsung, with moderation done by Ashok@STAG.

The key take ways from the panel discussion are:

  1. Continuous monitoring helps greatly as this is like a mirror that reflects what you do constantly, this is what Mehul@Arvind highlighted as being important in his domain of apparel/retail business. Ashok connected this to dashboards that are becoming vogue in our workplace, more in the Agile context
  2. Soumen@GM stated the importance of early stage validation like Simulation, Behavior modelling in the Automotive industry, as the cost of fix at the later stage is very expensive. The moderator connected this to “Shift Left”, the new term in our SW industry- how can we move validation to earlier stage(s)?
  3. Raghav@Trellborg a component manufacturer of high technology sealing systems stated need of understand of understanding the final context of usage of the component as being very important to know to ensure high quality. He also stated testing is deeply integrated into the “shop floor” i.e. daily work and the most important aspect of quality is not QA or QC but the underlying the Quality Systems in place. How do Q systems ensure that quality is deeply entrenched into the daily life. The moderator highlighted the fact the in software industry we have implemented systems, but these are still at an organizational level and the need of the hour in SW industry is to institutionalize these at a personal level
  4. Finally Murthy stated level of quality needed is not the same in all domains, in certain domains (like mobile) that have disruptive innovation and short life cycles, “we need just enough quality”. He highlighted the need to understand “technical debt” that we can tolerate as a driver for deciding “how much to test”

You can also read the special news on the panel discussion on Silicon India website.

Relavent topics:
a. Software testing lacking serious effort