Design checklists to “Do, Sync & Act”

This article is the second one on checklists, the first one being “The power of checklist“ Checklists seem to defend everyone, a kind cognitive net designed to catch flaws of memory and attention. Atul Gawande in his book “ The Checklist Manifesto” states that there are three kinds of problems in the world: SIMPLE: Individualistic in nature, solvable by application of simple techniques.e.g. Bake a cake. COMPLICATED: Can be broken

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The power of checklist

Recently I read the book “The Checklist Manifesto” by Atul Gawande.  “An essential primer on complexity in medicine” is what New York Times states about his book whilst The Hindu states this as “An unusual exploration of the power of to-do list”. As an individual committed to perfection, in constant search of scientific and smart ways to test/prevent and as an architect of Hypothesis Based Testing, I was spellbound reading

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Frictionless development testing

Very often in discussions with senior technical folks, the topic of developer testing and early stage quality pops up. And it is always about ‘we do not do good enough developer testing’ and how it has increased post release support. And they are keen on knowing ‘how to make developers test better and diligently’ and outlining their solution approach via automation and stricter process. The philosophy is always about “more

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Horse Blinders & Fish Eye vision

In a system which is a collection of various processes, templates form an integral element to aid implementation. Templates provide a framework to capture information in a structured manner. Very necessary in systems that require rigorous compliance. Why do horses used for pulling wagons wear blinders? Horses that pull wagons and carriages wear blinkers to prevent them from becoming distracted or panicked by what they see behind the wagon. They keep

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“Visual thinking” – Test smarter & faster

It is interesting that in the current technology/tool infested world, we have realised that human mind is the most powerful after all, and engaging it fully can solve the most complicated problems rapidly. One of the key ingredients of an engaged thinker is “Thinking visually” ; to clearly see the problem, solution or gaps. Design Thinking relies on sketching/drawing skills to imagine better ideas, figure out things, explain and give instructions.

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